An important infograph for Transgender Day of Visibility

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An important infograph for Transgender Day of Visibility

#1

Post by LOOT » Thu Mar 31, 2016 7:44 pm

Image

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#2

Post by I REALLY HATE POKEMON! » Thu Mar 31, 2016 8:12 pm

Were all of these people killed for being transgender?

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#3

Post by Apiary Tazy » Fri Apr 01, 2016 2:51 am

I don't know what any of you are saying but the asterisks make me upset regardless.

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#4

Post by LOOT » Sat Apr 02, 2016 2:03 am

[QUOTE="I REALLY HATE POKEMON!, post: 1591186, member: 18119"]Were all of these people killed for being transgender?[/QUOTE]
You see a graph showing rates of murder of transgender people and the first thing you want to ask is "but was it for being transgender"? A graph made especially for a day dedicated to the visibility of trans people, the suffering we've been through, and remembrance of those who were killed for the crime of being different? You need to seriously reconsider your approach.

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#5

Post by I REALLY HATE POKEMON! » Sat Apr 02, 2016 2:14 am

When you add "but" in there it sounds worse, which is why you did that. It was a normal question. You answered my question anyway, by saying "for the crime of being different." Could've just said "yes," but anything to go for my throat, I see.

Anyway, that's horrible.

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#6

Post by Apiary Tazy » Sat Apr 02, 2016 2:15 am

I don't know, I find the question 90% viable. Though there's no way to know for sure unless you want to go looking through every murder case and see the specifics of each one.

The other 10% is "HOLY S%#T WHAT IS HAPPENING IN CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA?" Because, you know, when I think of a country leading the world in transgender killings I think Brazil.

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#7

Post by I am nobody » Sat Apr 02, 2016 10:53 am

^Note that 65 countries is less than a third of the UN and barely a 4th of what are generally accepted to be "countries." Developing Asia and Africa are terrible about reporting crime statistics, so as bad as Brazil is, it's very possible that Latin America wouldn't be so alone if we had the data from the other 122 countries.

And we don't necessarily have to look at every case to make a guess about what's going on. Murder rates are usually given per 100k, so everything on that chart should be multiplied by 10 for comparisons versus the general homicide rate. By that metric, the top 5 they give there saw increases of 13.4% (Honduras is terrible for everyone), 187.4%, 58.7%, 345.5%, -12.9% (El Salvador), and 52%, respectively. Yes, I'm comparing a seven year total to yearly rates, but the most recent rates are often several years old for the general population, and transgender/sexual people are much less than 1/7th of the population, anyway. The rate of murder per 100k people it actually applies to is pretty hard to estimate, but assuming 2% of the population, scale all of these by 50/7. Even if you factor in location and poverty (which are fairly uniform in some of these countries), I seriously doubt you're going to see that increase drop much.

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#8

Post by LOOT » Sat Apr 02, 2016 5:16 pm

question

hypothetically say this chart is incorrect

what does that change, are you suggesting that trans people are lying about the cruelty they face day-to-day

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#9

Post by I REALLY HATE POKEMON! » Sat Apr 02, 2016 8:23 pm

If the chart was incorrect that would be an issue simply due to the fact that it would be misinformation. Doesn't negate that some trans people face their own hardships but bad information is never good.

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#10

Post by Apiary Tazy » Sat Apr 02, 2016 8:37 pm

When I called IRHP's question viable I did not mean to imply that its viability undermines the chart. I merely find the idea interesting. I doubt it would debunk what's here in any way.

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#11

Post by Random User » Sun Apr 03, 2016 4:42 am

I looked more into this since OP didn't have the article this chart came from: http://transrespect.org/en/tdov-2016-tmm-update/
On occasion of the International Transgender Day of Visibility (TDoV) [1] held on the 31st of March every year, Transgender Europe (TGEU) is publishing the Trans Murder Monitoring (TMM) project [2] update to join the voices raising awareness on this day about the multiple forms of discrimination faced by trans and gender diverse people worldwide.

This update (TMM TDoV 2016) reveals 2,016 reported killings of trans and gender diverse people in 65 countries worldwide between the 1st of January 2008 and the 31st of December 2015, more than 1,500 of which were reported in Central and South America. Further analysis of this data shows that 65% of all murdered trans and gender diverse people whose profession was known were sex workers. [3]

Throughout all six world regions, the highest absolute numbers have been found in countries with strong trans movements and civil society organisations that carry out forms of professional monitoring: Brazil (802), Mexico (229), Colombia (105), Venezuela (9 8) , and Honduras (79) in Central and South America; the United States (132) in North America; Turkey (41) and Italy (33) in Europe; and India (54), the Philippines (40) and Pakistan (34) in Asia. [4]

The close connection between the existence of strong trans movements and professional monitoring on the one hand, and the highest absolute numbers of reports, on the other hand, point to the worrisome question of unreported cases.

TGEU’s Senior Researcher, Carsten Balzer/Carla LaGata, explains, “Beside the need for mechanisms to protect trans and gender diverse people, this connection also shows the need for trans and gender diverse organisations capable of professional monitoring and reporting of violence against their communities. This connection results in the fact that the figures show only the tip of the iceberg of homicides of trans and gender diverse people on a worldwide scale.”

While Brazil, Mexico, and the United States have the highest absolute numbers, the relative numbers show even more alarming results for some countries with smaller population sizes. Honduras, for instance, has a rate of 9.56 reported trans and gender diverse people killings per million inhabitants. [5]

It is important to note that these cases are those that could be found through Internet search and cooperation with trans organisations and activists. In most countries, data on murdered trans and gender diverse people are not systematically produced, and it is impossible to estimate the numbers of unreported cases.



For More Information: TGEU Senior Researcher, Carsten Balzer/Carla LaGata, is available for interviews and questions, and can be reached at: carla[at]tgeu.org or +49-30-53602666.



Tables 2008-2015 (pdf) | Map (pdf) | Infographic



NOTES:

In 2012, Transgender Europe published “TRANSRESPECT VERSUS TRANSPHOBIA WORLDWIDE – A Comparative Review of the Human-rights Situation of Gender-variant/Trans People”, which contextualises the TMM data: http://transrespect.org/wp-content/uplo ... report.pdf

[1] The International Transgender Day of Visibility (TDoV) is dedicated to celebrating trans and gender diverse people, as well as raising awareness regarding the multiple forms of discrimination they worldwide.

[2] The Trans Murder Monitoring (TMM) project started in April 2009, and since then it has been systematically monitoring, collecting, and analysing reports of homicides of trans and gender diverse people worldwide. Updates of the results, which have been presented in July 2009 for the first time, are published on the “Transrespect versus Transphobia Worldwide” project website from two to four times a year in form of tables, name lists, and maps.

[3] A new report which takes a closer look at TMM data about the disproportionate numbers of cases of sex workers killed worldwide will be published in May 2016.

[4] The TMM TDoV 2016 update reports killings of trans and gender diverse people between January 2008 and December 2015 in all world regions: 1,573 killings in 23 countries in Central and South America, which account for 78% of the globally reported murders; 179 killings in 16 Asian countries; 137 killings in North America; 112 killings in 16 European countries; 10 killings have been reported in 4 African countries; and 5 killings in 4 countries in Oceania.

[5] Other Relative Numbers: In the case of Guyana, the rate is 5.00. In Brazil the rate is 4.00, in Mexico, 1.87, and in the United States, 0.42.

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#12

Post by Kil'jaeden » Thu Apr 07, 2016 11:46 am

[QUOTE="Tazy Ten, post: 1591422, member: 19345"]I don't know, I find the question 90% viable. Though there's no way to know for sure unless you want to go looking through every murder case and see the specifics of each one.

The other 10% is "HOLY S%#T WHAT IS HAPPENING IN CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA?" Because, you know, when I think of a country leading the world in transgender killings I think Brazil.[/QUOTE]

This is not much of a surprise. Their recorded murder rates are already high in most countries south of the US. Brazil in particular is very diverse, meaning high crime rates and general backwardness. In Honduras people get murdered faster than they can count them. There is also the unpopular fact that out there in the diverse parts of the world gays, transsexuals, and all others lumped in with them are not liked.

Africa is probably worse, they just don't have any way to count them all. I remember watching something from the Central African Republic where a group of men killed, cooked, and ate a guy right out in the open. People didn't even care that it happened. Parts of dead people get sold for medicine. Not to mention the common AIDS cure in parts of Africa. In Somalia and Sudan sharia squads occasionally execute people for various reasons. Killing a transsexual would not even show up on the radar in Africa.

The Middle East seems to be lacking. I assume Asia includes that, which means we are probably not dealing with Chinese people in that figure.
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